Am I at a disadvantage earning online because I am a Man?

Jon

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Was re-reading our discussion about mumpower on this site earlier and I got me thinking


I have applied to many work from home companies over the years and been turned down without even filling in an application form. I try and join female/mum communities of people who want to work from home and offer them advice and guidance and I pretty much get ignored at times.


Mum Bloggers I KNOW have it in for me. Mostly ignored a lot of the time or MASSIVE delays in responses to emails I send them.


I know sometimes it works in my favour with surveys and focus groups but I would say there is no doubting that the "earn from home" world is generally more female orientated and getting noticed or taken seriously is twice as hard it seems


Have I got it wrong?
 
J

JennyJack77

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I suspect you don't have it wrong. However, given the inequality women have faced in the employed world, I suspect the "working from home" world could argue it's a case of positive discrimination in favour of women. That doesn't mean they, or the situation, is right, but I suspect that's what they may argue.
 

stellajose

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I dunno.

I'm a mummy but not into blogging or the usual things you associate with WAHMs - baking cakes, selling make-up or books or naughty toys or whatever. Tupperware parties (do they still exist?). I'd say probably they are all predominantly female.

63336 and web search evaluation are equally opportunable - and if that's not a word, it ought to be - to both genders.

Things on Fiverr or whatever are also open to both genders.
 

Jon

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Maybe I phrased the question wrong then and maybe it is communities then that I am at a disadvantage with.

The Mum blogging/online community who are the main target for this site a lot of them time are ridiculously chatty on Twitter and on Facebook Groups.

I come along and post something or ask some questions regarding upping incomes and it's like I bring the black death with me or something lol

Maybe it's a stature thing within the blogging community..
 

busybusy

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My hunch is communities are probably just clicky, gender not much an issue, it just that than you are an outsider questioning them.
Opportunities - well swings and roundabouts.
 
P

Pheebs

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Jenny said:
I suspect you don't have it wrong. However, given the inequality women have faced in the employed world, I suspect the "working from home" world could argue it's a case of positive discrimination in favour of women. That doesn't mean they, or the situation, is right, but I suspect that's what they may argue.

Sorry, but I don't believe there is such thing as "positive discrimination".
 
P

Pheebs

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I think you're right, and I find it pretty annoying myself at times. I was reading through the Mum Power thread the other day, and found myself thinking "this isn't fair".

I'm eager to work, and keen to do well, yet I'm a man so can't work for them. Cheers. I don't think gender discrimination is acceptable on the basis that "well, we've been discriminated against for years..."

I doubt there's many tasks out there for women that I couldn't do equally as well.
 
J

JennyJack77

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Pheebs said:
Jenny said:
I suspect you don't have it wrong. However, given the inequality women have faced in the employed world, I suspect the "working from home" world could argue it's a case of positive discrimination in favour of women. That doesn't mean they, or the situation, is right, but I suspect that's what they may argue.

Sorry, but I don't believe there is such thing as "positive discrimination".

Legally speaking, there is. There is also the similar concept of positive action. (Random example: http://www.equalityhumanrights.com/your-rights/human-rights/what-are-human-rights%3F/the-human-rights-act/protection-from-discrimination.) However, just because it exists doesn't mean it's right, and certainly not in all cases.
 
P

Pheebs

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Jenny said:
Pheebs said:
Jenny said:
I suspect you don't have it wrong. However, given the inequality women have faced in the employed world, I suspect the "working from home" world could argue it's a case of positive discrimination in favour of women. That doesn't mean they, or the situation, is right, but I suspect that's what they may argue.

Sorry, but I don't believe there is such thing as "positive discrimination".

Legally speaking, there is. There is also the similar concept of positive action. (Random example: http://www.equalityhumanrights.com/your-rights/human-rights/what-are-human-rights%3F/the-human-rights-act/protection-from-discrimination.) However, just because it exists doesn't mean it's right, and certainly not in all cases.

Discrimination is discrimination as far as I'm concerned.

For example, I don't think it would okay to have a company that only provided opportunities to black people because they've been discriminated against in the past. That's not how the world should work in my opinion, and it's certainly not promoting equality.

The best thing an organisation can do is open its arms to everyone - any age, gender, race etc. etc. I have to admit; I feel quite negative towards Mum Power simply because they're discriminating against me and other men for, from what I can tell, no reason at all.
 

Jon

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You could also miss out on work from home opportunities because of your sex
 
P

Pheebs

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Jon@TheMoneyShed said:
You could also miss out on work from home opportunities because of your sex

Yeah - sometimes I wonder why I've been rejected instantly. Without sounding big headed - I'm definitely qualified enough for most of these roles, and have experience in most of them. Yet I'm often turned down instantly. Perhaps they have loads of applications, and that's likely why - or they don't want me - but I do wonder whether it's sometimes because I'm male.
 
J

JennyJack77

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Pheebs said:
Jenny said:
Pheebs said:
Jenny said:
I suspect you don't have it wrong. However, given the inequality women have faced in the employed world, I suspect the "working from home" world could argue it's a case of positive discrimination in favour of women. That doesn't mean they, or the situation, is right, but I suspect that's what they may argue.

Sorry, but I don't believe there is such thing as "positive discrimination".

Legally speaking, there is. There is also the similar concept of positive action. (Random example: http://www.equalityhumanrights.com/your-rights/human-rights/what-are-human-rights%3F/the-human-rights-act/protection-from-discrimination.) However, just because it exists doesn't mean it's right, and certainly not in all cases.

Discrimination is discrimination as far as I'm concerned.

For example, I don't think it would okay to have a company that only provided opportunities to black people because they've been discriminated against in the past. That's not how the world should work in my opinion, and it's certainly not promoting equality.

The best thing an organisation can do is open its arms to everyone - any age, gender, race etc. etc. I have to admit; I feel quite negative towards Mum Power simply because they're discriminating against me and other men for, from what I can tell, no reason at all.

I wasn't necessarily disagreeing with your opinion (though it's a minefield of a topic and not one I would begin to do justice to on here) - I was disagreeing with your belief that the concept of positive discrimination doesn't exist.
 

Jon

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focus groups selection is a form of positive discrimination
 

Bexxx

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Pheebs said:
Jon@TheMoneyShed said:
You could also miss out on work from home opportunities because of your sex

Yeah - sometimes I wonder why I've been rejected instantly. Without sounding big headed - I'm definitely qualified enough for most of these roles, and have experience in most of them. Yet I'm often turned down instantly. Perhaps they have loads of applications, and that's likely why - or they don't want me - but I do wonder whether it's sometimes because I'm male.

I have been rejected outright for positions I know I am qualified for and well able to do. And I am female.
 

busybusy

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I was once asked in a job interview (about 15 years ago) how being female would effect my ability to do the job. It was an office job if that makes any difference.

I was that shocked I hashed an answer together. Got invited to the next stage of selection, but decided not the type of company I wanted to work for.
 
P

Pheebs

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Bexxx said:
Pheebs said:
Jon@TheMoneyShed said:
You could also miss out on work from home opportunities because of your sex

Yeah - sometimes I wonder why I've been rejected instantly. Without sounding big headed - I'm definitely qualified enough for most of these roles, and have experience in most of them. Yet I'm often turned down instantly. Perhaps they have loads of applications, and that's likely why - or they don't want me - but I do wonder whether it's sometimes because I'm male.

I have been rejected outright for positions I know I am qualified for and well able to do. And I am female.

And as I said in my post - I appreciate that there are loads of reasons I might be rejected. I'm simply saying that I do wonder sometimes if it's to do with my gender.
 
P

Pheebs

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Jenny said:
Pheebs said:
Jenny said:
Pheebs said:
Jenny said:
I suspect you don't have it wrong. However, given the inequality women have faced in the employed world, I suspect the "working from home" world could argue it's a case of positive discrimination in favour of women. That doesn't mean they, or the situation, is right, but I suspect that's what they may argue.

Sorry, but I don't believe there is such thing as "positive discrimination".

Legally speaking, there is. There is also the similar concept of positive action. (Random example: http://www.equalityhumanrights.com/your-rights/human-rights/what-are-human-rights%3F/the-human-rights-act/protection-from-discrimination.) However, just because it exists doesn't mean it's right, and certainly not in all cases.

Discrimination is discrimination as far as I'm concerned.

For example, I don't think it would okay to have a company that only provided opportunities to black people because they've been discriminated against in the past. That's not how the world should work in my opinion, and it's certainly not promoting equality.

The best thing an organisation can do is open its arms to everyone - any age, gender, race etc. etc. I have to admit; I feel quite negative towards Mum Power simply because they're discriminating against me and other men for, from what I can tell, no reason at all.

I wasn't necessarily disagreeing with your opinion (though it's a minefield of a topic and not one I would begin to do justice to on here) - I was disagreeing with your belief that the concept of positive discrimination doesn't exist.

I'm not disagreeing with the concept as it were. I'm saying I don't believe it's possible to have positive discrimination, no matter how you dress it up.
 

Jon

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Discrimination obviously does happen in the 'work from home' world otherwise we wouldn't have the likes of mumpower or mumtrepreneurs etc who all want to harness that power.
 
P

Pheebs

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It's certainly an interesting topic.

For sake of the debate - if I go along with the concept of positive discrimination, I'd probably say that the focus group side is very different to the overall work from home aspect.

I'll try to explain myself a bit better:

If focus groups have been/are predominantly filled with women, the idea of males being selected more easily isn't so much discrimination, but rather balancing the data that's already out there. If there are 1000 female applicants, and only 50 male applicants, it stands to reason that a male would be more likely to be selected, and probably seen as more valuable as they have a much bigger pool of females.

In terms of work at home opportunities - the idea that women would be selected over men because they've been discriminated against in the past is a completely different ball game. It's a method that would be sexist in its very nature; a way of settling the score if you will. Perhaps that's a little extreme, but I hope you get my point.

I'd be interested to know what some of the female members of this forum think about the "work at home mum" idea being pushed more and more these days. In an equal world, shouldn't the notion of "work at home dad" be pushed a little more, allowing men to stay and look after children, and giving women the chance to go out and work wherever they want?
 
J

JennyJack77

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Pheebs said:
Jenny said:
Pheebs said:
Jenny said:
Pheebs said:
Jenny said:
I suspect you don't have it wrong. However, given the inequality women have faced in the employed world, I suspect the "working from home" world could argue it's a case of positive discrimination in favour of women. That doesn't mean they, or the situation, is right, but I suspect that's what they may argue.

Sorry, but I don't believe there is such thing as "positive discrimination".

Legally speaking, there is. There is also the similar concept of positive action. (Random example: http://www.equalityhumanrights.com/your-rights/human-rights/what-are-human-rights%3F/the-human-rights-act/protection-from-discrimination.) However, just because it exists doesn't mean it's right, and certainly not in all cases.

Discrimination is discrimination as far as I'm concerned.

For example, I don't think it would okay to have a company that only provided opportunities to black people because they've been discriminated against in the past. That's not how the world should work in my opinion, and it's certainly not promoting equality.

The best thing an organisation can do is open its arms to everyone - any age, gender, race etc. etc. I have to admit; I feel quite negative towards Mum Power simply because they're discriminating against me and other men for, from what I can tell, no reason at all.

I wasn't necessarily disagreeing with your opinion (though it's a minefield of a topic and not one I would begin to do justice to on here) - I was disagreeing with your belief that the concept of positive discrimination doesn't exist.

I'm not disagreeing with the concept as it were. I'm saying I don't believe it's possible to have positive discrimination, no matter how you dress it up.

I understand what you're saying - you don't like the concept and you would most likely disagree with court decisions that have gone in its favour. And you're absolutely entitled to that opinion. In most cases I probably wouldn't disagree with you either. However, there are times when I'm at ease with the concept. Eg: company advertises job, two people apply, both equally qualified, but company has no male workers. To address this imbalance, the man would get the job. Now, of course, that's a different situation to the one Jon raised regarding Mumpower and as I initially said, I don't think he's wrong. I do think Parentpower would work just as well. Or indeed Massivelytalentedfolkwithorwithoutchildrenpower. Catchy.
 

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