Bulb energy - cheap renewable energy and £50 credit for switching!

W3Schools
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#62
Just 14 days from using a referral link, to get the additional £50 cashback, to my utilities being with Bulb. By far the cheapest deal for 100% green electric and 10% natural gas. In addition Bulb discount my monthly bill with a loyalty discount for staying with them. If you are also looking to take advantage of the additional £50 cashback from your first bill; this link will provide that bulb.co.uk/refer/mrijd7762 or join.bulb.co.uk/refer/mrijd7762


BTW - £50 referral works whether you take one or both fuels. Not tried using my first link to buy just gas, and getting £50; then using my second link to buy electric. Possible you would get £100 off, as Bulb aren’t mean at applying the discount. They have always been really good at honouring it.
 
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#63
I have just moved from SSE to Bulb. My 3 year deal was coming to an end and SSE wanted me to pay £122 a year (combined gas and leccy). This was frankly more than I can afford, so I have done a lot of research and decided on Bulb (nearly chose OVO but didn't like some of their reviews). I must admit I am nervous about moving, but I am paying £89.79 a month with Bulb combined based on my highest ever yearly Kwh readings (20598 gas, 2683 leccy) from the last 12 months due to the awful winter. We are in a 3 bed semi and use energy mostly on Evenings and Weekends. I took a punt because normally I would never move to a small supplier but having no get out fee means I am not trapped. I am going to overpay a little until I figure out how economical the move has been then tweak my payments after a few months.

Yes - Bulb have only one variable tariff, (less confusing) but for me at least, it is miles cheaper than SSE. If it ever creeps up with Bulb to the point of reaching SSE prices I could move to a fixed long term deal elsewhere, but it would have to increase by a huge amount to have the variable rate cause a problem.

It was really easy switch and took just a few minutes and that was it. No hassle and now saving a small fortune. (make sure you tailor your quote from your Kwh readings and not what you pay) Really chuffed I have done this and Bulb have been really helpful on the Web Chat. Bulb use electricity created by our lovely star, some wind and the sea doing its tide shenanigans. The Gas is partly from reclaimed sources too....Cows probably!

Another immediate plus is that bulb give you £50 credit for signing up. You then get given a referral which you can post on Facebook, Twitter or wherever and then you get more credit too when people use your link. Shameless marketing by Bulb? Maybe, but credit is credit. Plus, it means a bit of spare cash to spend on the kids. Will it be a good decision moving? If I save £400 a year yes. Thanks for reading - and thanks very much in advance if you use my referral link below.

My Bulb Referral Sign-up link is:

bulb.co.uk/refer/simond8761
 

Sirhct

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#64
One thing worth saying that a friend informed me, is that if you get a positive balance from referral credits you can withdraw this as real money from Bulb at any time.
 
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#65
I am saving over £35 a month switching to bulb.
Switching was easy, just a quick initial sign up and had to provide meter readings.
Bulb uses greener, renewable energy and there are no exit fees charged. So if you are not happy, you are free to leave with no hassle.
Bulb will also pay up to £120 of exit fees, if charged by your previous provider.
I received £50 credit from a referral code.
If anyone would like to use my code, we will both receive a £50 credit when you sign up.
bulb.co.uk/refer/lisap1393
 

homie

One of the finest Matched Betting helpers around!
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#67
Can someone explain to a Luddite stuck in the 20th century (me) how this actually works. I mean, imagine I buy my electricity as 100% green energy from Bulb while my next door neighbour buys their energy from Big Bad Coal and Gas Ltd. We both get the same electricity from the same cables through the national grid, yet different companies are charging different amounts for power from supposedly different origins.

Then i switch to another provider, charging a different amount. But what am I actually switching? The gas still smells the same and the electricity still just as sparky as before. I'm just paying for a different company to read my meter and bill me. I've never really got why it was all privatised in the first place*?

*apart from to give Margaret Thatcher more money for handbags perhaps.
 

InItForTheMoney

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#69
Can someone explain to a Luddite stuck in the 20th century (me) how this actually works. I mean, imagine I buy my electricity as 100% green energy from Bulb while my next door neighbour buys their energy from Big Bad Coal and Gas Ltd. We both get the same electricity from the same cables through the national grid, yet different companies are charging different amounts for power from supposedly different origins.

Then i switch to another provider, charging a different amount. But what am I actually switching? The gas still smells the same and the electricity still just as sparky as before. I'm just paying for a different company to read my meter and bill me. I've never really got why it was all privatised in the first place*?

*apart from to give Margaret Thatcher more money for handbags perhaps.

Hi Homie,

You're right in that all gas and leccy goes via the national infrastructure, so the clean, green stuff gets mixed with the dirty stuff; however Bulb and, I presume, the other green providers (Octopus, Ecotricity etc) take account of your usage to buy the appropriate amount of green energy and ensure that's fed into the grid. As such less coal etc gets burned and more solar, wind and hydro is used.

IFAIK ultimately the energy companies price differences are down to:
1. How efficiently each company is run;
2. How well they predict their customers needs- i.e. have they bought enough wholesale energy at the right time (normally 3 months ahead) and for the right price;
3. How much they think can charge customers.
 

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